My Ronson Rice Cooker


So some of you may know from my twitter but some few weeks have passed now since I bought a Ronson Rice cooker. Before this we had a gifted one. A Kmart Homemaker cheap one. The cheap one was good at first but it had a lot of problems that made it dangerous to use. It would constantly over boil no matter how you did it and often the rice was undercooked. It over boiled over the power cord where it plugged in and I hated it. In fact since it was our first rice cooker we thought well maybe they are all like this so I hit up youtube and saw a Ronson Rice Cooker in action. I had to have one. In the meantime I had to wait. I started washing my rice before I cooked it to remove the starch. This helped a great deal with the over boil in my cheap rice cooker but it would still over boil and spit. I’d have crusty rice water all over my kitchen bench and curtains. It was frustrating.

Then my Fiance gave me $50 for a blender. Of course by that time the blender I wanted was gone and a better one appeared for $70. So I looked up a few stores online for a rice cooker and found a Ronson rice cooker for $40. I think it was either $40 or $45. Either way it was possible to buy it. So I did. I’m extremely happy with it. My old one was hard to clean, this one promised easy clean and it was true. I use a wet sponge. Wipe it out and it’s done. And the feature I adore the most about it is it’s steam water residue catcher. You open the lid, the water trickles down into a detachable compartment. No water on the outside any more. No more danger of water near a power cord. I can have my rice prewashed or unwashed and it never over boils. I love it’s pressure cooker style lid and little steam chimney! The lid is definitely one of my most favourite features. I burned myself many times on the cheap one. Even while using oven gloves and a tea towel, the pot, though in warm mode would still spit because of the liquid on the rim. The Ronson rice cooker has won my heart. It’s safe, it works and it does everything promised. And it keeps my rice warm instead of turning it into a crusty uneatable brick like my old cheap one.

Below are a few photo’s of my Ronson rice cooker. One photo is off the first wash of rice and all the starch that came off it. I read somewhere many people saying wash first but they didn’t know why they were just raised that it was important and then finally I read why from someone and it makes perfect sense. My mother always washed her rice after cooking to remove starch but I personally don’t believe cooking that starch into it and washing off residue last. I’d rather do what I can in the beginning.

This rice cooker is worth buying. I love it and use it nearly every night.

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Homemade Soy Milk Using A Slow Cooker


I’ve always enjoyed slow cooked anything but what lead me to using a slow cooker for soy milk was because my stove is awful. The element only heats on one side on all of them and it’s hard to cook things at an even temperature. My first milk batch was too raw. Second attempt had an under taste of burn. The bottom slightly burned. And since I can’t get a new oven I had to think of some other way to cook my homemade soy milk. I thought, why not the slow cooker? It wouldn’t over boil and foam wouldn’t rise so why not? First I googled if anyone had and I couldn’t find so much as a blog post so I went with what I knew and the results where beautiful. It made the perfect soy milk. It also doesn’t have a raw bean taste like my other milks had. I put in some vanilla bean this time for flavouring and slow cooked it on high for 2hrs. I’m going to be making my soy milk this way from now on.

Below a picture of my slow cooking soy milk. 1 cup of hydrated soy beans, 3 and a half cups of filtered water. 1inch vanilla bean.
Soymilk

Homemade Toasted Rice Rice Milk


I’ve tried every way to make rice milk and I didn’t like any of them but I was determined to get it to work until I had an idea. I like the consistency of raw rice rice milk but I didn’t like how it tasted. It was to raw. I was going crazy trying to think of how to get it with a cooked flavour and then it hit me. Toasted.

I make my own rice flour for a variety of reasons, one of which being, to make short bread. After or before I make my rice flour, I toast it to preserve it and to stop it from going moldy to make sure it has no more moisture left after soaking it. So I did this to my rice milk batch.

I used one cup of brown rice and soaked it for several hours. After draining it thoroughly I toasted it lightly in my frying pan. Enough to make it dry but also until it smelled delicious. After I was done I put it in a heat safe bowl to cool. Then I added 3 cups of way and blended it. Because it’s raw it takes a long time. To speed it up, I blended it, then used my sieve to filter it and gathered the pulp in my strainer, placed that back in the blender with rice milk at half the amount and blended. I repeated this until my rice pulp was as fine as rice flour. This was my end result also I am sorry for the mess in my photo:

Rice milk, home made

Rice milk, home made

 

When I placed my hands in the milk (something I do to check the consistency) I noticed it was exactly like cows milk. Very white, watery like cows milk and it tasted a lot better. However to use it, it functions like any other type of rice milk except my batch is much stronger than store bought. I was very surprised by the resulted and delighted. After all the recipes I tried and read, this method works better. I tried it all and I am glad I had thought to toast my soaked grains.

I hope this post might help others out there making their own home made rice milk.

Potato, Pumkin & Leak Soup


Ingredients:

° 3 large potatoes
° 3 decent sized cuts of your favourite pumkin
° 1 onion
° 1 teaspon or more of garlic to taste
° 1 to 2 leaves of leek.
° 1 litre of chicken stock
° olive oil
° cream (optional but recommended)

Instructions:
Lightly oil a frying pan. Dice the onion and the white part of the leek and place in the frying pan along with a teaspon or more of garlic to taste. Lightly fry until leek is cooked. Put aside for later.

Prepare chicken stock. Dice green part of leek and add to the stock. Let sit until ready to use.

Cut potatoes after peeling them, into quarters and cut the pumkin into chunks. If the pumkin is to tough to peel then wait until they are half steamed and then peel them after they are cool. Prepare them for steaming. Only half cook them.

After half steaming peel pumkin. Use a stock pot or large pot and add chicken stock, fried onion and leak, potatoes and pumkin. Bring to a boil and then turn it down to about half heat and cook for 15 minutes. After that, bring heat down till there are no bubbles and simmer for another 15 mins. Take pot off stove after its done and allow to sit for 10 to 20 mins. This is important. It will further cook itself and allow more flavour to soak into the veggies. Also we want it to no longer be scalding before making it into pure.

The last thing to do is to blend it into pure. Using either a hand blender or nagic bullet. After blending it is optional but you can add some thin cream and stir it in to make it extra yummy. This mix makes approximately 2 litres of soup. It is nice hot or cold and is quite filling.

I hope you’ll enjoy it!

Almond Milk Chai Late Recipe


Almonds

Almonds (Photo credit: Shelby PDX)

So I’ve been experimenting with almond milk. Looking for an alternative to milk and soy milk. I love soy but not so much so for coffee. Then I discovered this love blend in the kitchen. I have a bullet blender style blender but a cheaper but still good version of it with full sized milkshake cups to blend in.

Ingredients:

Almonds

Water

Manuka Honey

Cinnamon

Vanilla Extract

How To Make:

Since I have a bullet style blender I fill my milkshake cup with about a quarter of almonds. Then I place half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder not cinnamon sugar. Next I add 1 teaspoon of Manuka honey. Then I fill the rest of the cup with water and add about half a teaspoon or a quarter teaspoon depending on how much I want to taste the vanilla.

Next, I make sure the blending lid with blades is very secure before I place onto the blender and I blend until I can’t see much of the almond skin and it becomes a lovely pale browny colour. Depending on the type of blender it will take anywhere from 30seconds to 2minutes. Fairly quick though.

Next I strain it as thoroughly as possible using a fine mesh strainer. If I don’t have a nut milking bag then I might use an old clean and sterilized stocking. I tend to keep the left over almond meal to dehydrate and place in cereal. Then it’s ready to put in coffee or tea.

This mix tastes a lot like a chai tea or chai late and it’s fantastic! I like it better than most store bought chai teas now. Wonderful taste, fairly quick to make. I have noticed with other almond milk recipes that it recommends soaking over night. I tried both and got the same kind of results for my almond milk but really it’s up to you on how you make it.

Hope you like what I had to share ❤