YouTube Toon Boom Tips Channel – Adding Ease in Animate Pro and Harmony


Originally posted on Toon Boom Blog:

Toon Boom Animation Website

Toon Boom Tip of the Week

In the latest installment of our Tip of the Week series of Animation tutorials our resident expert and Professional Product Manager, Lilly Vogelesang, will explain how to Add Ease in Animate, Animate Pro and Harmony. 

In animation, the ease, also known as velocity, is the acceleration and deceleration of a motion. It can either be a motion created by a function curve or a series of animated drawings. Other common terms for ease-in and ease-out are slow-in and slow-out.

The short video is 5 minutes long. Lilly shows  adding drawing, extending exposure, add peg layer and keyframes, she discusses the ease path and then demonstrates how to put an ease on a specific function, in this case the velocity function. Lilly continues by showing an example of how the ease is applied. Following this other ways of applying an…

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Top Five Fictional Libraries


draconianrain:

Couldn’t possibly agree more!

Originally posted on What I Like:

Libraries represent a world of open opportunities, the ability to not only learn but to immerse yourself in any number of worlds fictional or not. The library is a magical place and often it is within fictional worlds that this is demonstrated the most. Fictional libraries are often depicted as either realistic spaces in which characters retreat to learn or they are majestic and magical beings.

The libraries that are featured within this list have been taken from a number of sources, ranging from films, television shows, books and even poetry. The libraries discussed within are huge and humble, magical and mundane, but what they all have in common is they all have a powerful presence. The libraries within this list all represent what is so wondrous about books and the libraries that house them. However, as with modern libraries, books are not all that lie within their shelves, there…

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InDesign What I Love About It As A Comic Artist


I know what some of you might be thinking. But it is one of the best programs that I ever subscribed to. Some of you know or a little while I was self publishing on Lulu.com and during that year I spent almost a year trying to get it to upload correctly until one day I’d had enough and subscribed to InDesign. Later I upgraded my adobe package to all apps. But it was the best thing I ever did.

I no longer have the bleed issues I once had and for those of you that publish comics, you will know the exact pain and annoyance I am talking about. I tried with everything to alleviate it but nothing worked. I tried OpenOffice, Word, Photoshop and even GIMP but nothing was going right. I still had major issues with the bleed being to thick, to short or my art getting cut off in the spine or off the page edges.

The main problems I was having was when it came to resizing. As a comic artist I have to work at 1200dpi for various reasons the main one being quality and screentone range. That’s usually around 8000px by 12000 px or so per page. When I finally started using InDesign my headaches (literally) we far less. Being able to set up the perfect template bleed, drag and drop and not loose image quality was by far the best part for me.

Aligning, numbering, watermarking and exporting became a breeze. These are all the reasons as to why I have come to love it. If it wasn’t so hard to get the perfect bleed for publishing in Photoshop and loosing image quality then I probably wouldn’t have found or needed it but it’s so important that it’s almost critical.

I can’t even begin to describe the hell I went through plus the money in carbon copies. I have such good faith in InDesign that I only buy one carbon copy knowing that it’s going to be perfect anyway. And I recommend it to anyone that is a writer or comic artist or any other desktop publishing career. It’s absolutely worth it and worth learning.

The only downside for me was the inital learning curve. At first it wasn’t too bad since I had learned Adobe Illustrator the prior to using InDesign but it was hard for me (as an artist) to get use to all the new tools and terminology. But it was worth it. It’s a program that keeps paying off. Not only that but since it’s so widely use you can always acquire a job or freelancing work with inDesign.

Overall it’s a great tool. If you have something else that you use that you think is better or just as good please do leave your thoughts in the comments below. I’d love to hear from you and I’m sure others would as well.

 

Happy Blogging!!